Ncheḿús

Coast Salish, Public Art, North Vancouver
Coast Salish, Public Art, North Vancouver
Coast Salish, Public Art, North Vancouver
Coast Salish, Public Art, North Vancouver
Coast Salish, Public Art, North Vancouver
Indigenous, Integrated, Mural

The imagery featured on this highway sound wall, represents an innovative collaboration between local Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) artists, carver Aaron Nelson-Moody (Splash) and weaver Angela George. In this work entitled, Ncheḿús meaning “coming together” the artists have artfully intertwined the traditional imagery local Coast Salish carving and local Coast Salish weaving together into one dynamic piece of contemporary art.  Each of the 28 panels has its own message to tell about nature, humanity and Coast Salish wisdom.  

 

Specifications

Digital printed mural on highway wall sound buffering panels

About the Artists:
Aaron Nelson-Moody / Tawx'sin Yexwulla is a Squamish First Nation educator who has worked to preserve Coast Salish art and culture He works within his own community educational structure, and shares important traditions of intercultural connection in public schools, and through community engagement projects. His work on projects in various media include large scale wood carvings such as houseposts and canoes, down to smaller silver jewelry engraving and repousse pieces.  
Artist Website

Angela George carries two ancestral names, sits’sáts’tenat and qʷənat. Her late mother is slatwx, Cookie Thomas (Cole/Discon/Billy family) from Sḵwxwú7mesh and her father is from the Baker family from Sḵwxwú7mesh and the Jones and Peter family on Vancouver Island.  This Coast Salish mother of 4 has dedicated her career to the betterment of First Nations people and communities. Traditionally groomed, she has a strong understanding of her culture and spiritual teachings and the impacts of colonization and barriers that plague First Nations communities. She has a strong passion in traditional canoe racing, weaving and cultural singing and dancing and believes that practicing traditions and having a strong sense of identity and connection to our ancestors is vital to community wellness, development and sustainability. George has recently completed an EMBA in Indigenous Business Leadership at SFU.